A Southern Grace: we have the meats.

October 30, 2015

we have the meats.

Yum

As a kid, I didn't much care for pot roast.


As any good mother would do, Mamster always put some on my plate anyway, but it didn't always end up in my stomach.

I definitely used the furtive spit-into-napkin technique, and I'm pretty sure there was a time when I kept the meat in my cheeks until I was well away from the table and could spit it out. Mammy may have to be consulted to confirm that one, though. Maybe I was just saving it for a snack to have later.

While I still don't love the roast part of pot roast, I do (and did, even back then)(all those many, many, many years ago) love the veggies that are cooked in the broth with the meat. Carrots, potatoes, and onions are at their level best when they've been softened and infused with the flavors from a cooked hunk of beef.*

*Because of this, I've concluded that my distaste for pot roast comes not from its flavor, but from its texture. I think having to chew one mouthful for so long is a bit off-putting to me, but as they say, different strokes for different folks.

One pot roast can feed many mouths, but some argue that it tastes even better upon reheating, so don't fret about leftovers. (I never do.) People sometimes thicken the broth from a pot roast to make a gravy, but my preference is to ladle the veggies and liquid over a huge hunk of crusty bread or even a thick slice of toasted sandwich bread--I can always get behind a little sopping action. This is another slow cooker recipe, which means that I do the work in the morning and enjoy the rewards that evening, and that's always a good thing.

Crock-Pot Pot Roast
Based on this recipe
(printable recipe)
Ingredients:

  • 2 to 3 pounds beef chuck roast
  • 1 large onion, peeled and sliced into chunks
  • 1-2 sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks
  • 3-4 white potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks
  • 1 cup baby carrots
  • 2 cups beef stock
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
  • Salt, freshly ground black pepper, garlic powder, and dried oregano, to taste
Directions:
Pat the beef dry with paper towels and season generously with salt, pepper, garlic powder, and oregano.
Set a large Dutch oven or heavy skillet over medium-high to high heat.
Add a bit of olive oil and the beef, searing both sides until golden brown, about 5 minutes per side, and transfer the meat to the bowl of the slow cooker.
Add the onions, sweet potatoes, white potatoes, and carrots to the slow cooker, scattering the pieces around the meat.
In a separate bowl, whisk the beef stock, mustard, balsamic vinegar, and maple syrup until combined.
Pour the liquid mixture over the roast. Close the lid and cook on LOW heat until the meat falls apart and is meltingly tender, about 8 hours.
You can eat it like this and sop up that broth with some crusty bread. Alternatively, you can pour the cooking liquids into large saucepan, bring to a boil, and cook until the gravy is reduced to desired thickness.


My boys.

My fellas (and just one of Marleau's ears) join me in wishing a properly sweet and spooky Halloween to all!

14 comments:

Pam said...

Great pics! Your pot roast sounds good! It is one of my fave meals, loved it when I was a kid only I never heard it called pot roast until many years later. It was always called chuck roast. Leftover and ground, it makes the best beef salad sandwich, a little mayo, relish and onion. We love it!

lisa is cooking said...

I'm pretty sure I employed some of those pot roast avoiding techniques! I'm with you regarding the vegetables though. It must smell amazing after slow cooking all day.

Marjie said...

Hold the spiders with my serving, please. I use a chuck roast for pot roast, and mine falls apart. No long-term chewing commitments.

Marleau is just adorable! Looks like a happy little dude! (Does your fiance know his butt is now on the internet?)

Angie Schneider said...

Your pot roast looks fantastic! I am not much of red meat eater, but this looks really great that I would love to have some too.

Big Rigs 'n Lil' Cookies said...

You made me laugh out loud and your ways to avoid eating the roast. That was me with cherries. My mom would confirm :) I can remember having to write, one hundred times, about not hiding the cherry pie or something like that.
Like your twist of maple syrup and balsamic in the roast.

Patricia Bacon said...

HaHa I use the napkin technique on fruitcake as a child when we visited +++ relatives at Christmas time!!! Still don't like it!

The pot roast looks delish. Happy Halloween to you and "the boys"!!

grace said...

@Marjie: No. No, he does not. :)

Beth said...

When I was a kid, I didn't always like vegetables, but I loved the vegetables that came with pot roast too. I don't make roasts nearly often enough - I always enjoy them!

I Wilkerson said...

I absolutely hated pot roast as a kid--and it still isn't one of my faves. In fact the chuck roasts from my quarter of beef figure into my logic for why I'd like a meat grinder ;-) I totally agree with you on the veggies though--the brown roasty potatoes, uber sweet carrots, sometimes some mushrooms and leeks. Hmm, almost worth cooking up a pot roast for alright...

Kate @ Framed Cooks said...

I collect pot roast recipes like kids collect baseball cards, I love it so much - even when I was a kid! Now, lima beans for dinner was a different story back then! Adding this scrumptious one to my collection. :)

Marcelle @ A Little Fish in the Kitchen said...

I'm not much for red meat at all, but I completely agree about the veggies that simmer with a roast, they're delicious! Love your pictures!

Marcela N said...

Love your pictures! Seems like fun!!

PS. It's Marcela from tortadellafiglia I moved to tastefolio.com! Hope you'll like it :)

Katerina said...

I never say no to a good pot roast as this one and the veggies is definitely a big plus!

Lorraine @ Not Quite Nigella said...

Your puppy is a real cutie! And you're too funny. I can imagine your cheeks bursting with roast! I used to dislike chicken meat but loved the skin so I used to keep it under the napkin or plate :)